Travel Guides - Netflix

Thu 27 June 2019

Filed under netflix

Tags netflix Reality English

In this hilarious new series, six groups of ordinary Australians – families, couples and friends – take on the job of travel critics. Our travel guides experience the same week-long international and domestic holidays, and review the same accommodation, cuisine, and local sights. But one person's idea of paradise can be another's idea of hell.

Travel Guides - Netflix

Type: Reality

Languages: English

Status: To Be Determined

Runtime: 60 minutes

Premier: 2017-02-14

Travel Guides - Lonely Planet - Netflix

Lonely Planet is the largest travel guide book publisher in the world. The company is owned by American billionaire Brad Kelley's NC2 Media, which bought it in 2013 from BBC Worldwide for US$77 million (the equivalent of £45.5 million in May 2014) after it was valued at US$250 million in 2008. Originally called “Lonely Planet Publications”, the company changed its name to “Lonely Planet” in July 2009 to reflect its broad travel industry coverage and an emphasis on digital products. The Lonely Planet books were the third series of travel books aimed at backpackers and other low-cost travellers, after the Let's Go travel guide series that was founded in 1960, and the BIT Guides from 1970. As of 2011, the company had sold 120 million books since inception and by early 2014, it had sold around 11 million units of its travel apps. As of 2014, Lonely Planet's largest office is located in Footscray, a suburb of Melbourne, Australia, but its Franklin, Tennessee, United States office is the company's de facto headquarters. Other Lonely Planet offices are spread throughout the world, in locations such as London, United Kingdom; Beijing, China; and Delhi, India.

Travel Guides - Controversies - Netflix

A mention in a Lonely Planet guidebook can draw large numbers of travellers, which changes places mentioned. For example, Lonely Planet has been blamed for the rise of what is sometimes referred to as 'the Banana Pancake Trail' in South East Asia. Critics argue that this has led to the destruction of local culture and disturbance of once quiet sites. In 1996, in response to a “Visit Myanmar” campaign by the Burmese military government, the Burmese opposition National League for Democracy (NLD) and its leader Aung San Suu Kyi called for a tourism boycott. As the publication of Lonely Planet's guidebook to Myanmar (Burma) is seen by some as an encouragement to visit that country, this led to calls for a boycott of Lonely Planet. Lonely Planet's view is that it highlights the issues surrounding a visit to the country, and that it wants to make sure that readers make an informed decision. In 2009, the NLD formally dropped its previous stance and now welcomes visitors “who are keen to promote the welfare of the common people”.

Travel Guides - References - Netflix


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