Superfoods: The Real Story - Netflix

Sat 22 June 2019

Filed under netflix

Tags netflix Documentary English

Kate Quilton returns for a new series investigating the purported health benefits of superfoods. Superfoods seem to be everywhere - not a day goes by without a 'superfood' story hitting the headlines. Backing up these eye-grabbing stories are thousands of studies devoted to connecting the humblest of ingredients to the grandest of claims. But just what can we believe? Kate investigates the real science behind the supposed health benefits and reveals which foods truly deserve the title - super.

Superfoods: The Real Story - Netflix

Type: Documentary

Languages: English

Status: Running

Runtime: 30 minutes

Premier: 2015-06-29

Superfoods: The Real Story - Britpop - Netflix

Britpop is a UK based music and culture movement in the mid 1990s which emphasised “Britishness”, and produced brighter, catchier alternative rock, partly in reaction to the popularity of the darker lyrical themes of the US-led grunge music, an alternative rock genre, and to the UK's own shoegazing music scene. The most successful bands linked with the movement are Oasis, Blur, Suede and Pulp; those groups would come to be known as its “big four”. The timespan of Britpop is generally considered to be 1993-1997, with 1994-1995, and a chart battle between Blur and Oasis dubbed “The Battle of Britpop”, being the epicentre of activity. While music was the main focus, fashion, art, and politics also got involved, with artists such as Damien Hirst being involved in creating videos for Blur, and being labelled as Britart or Britpop artists, and Tony Blair and New Labour aligning themselves with the movement. Fans of Britpop also tended to be fans of dance acts such as The Prodigy and the Chemical Brothers. (Both having played at Knebworth in 1996). Though Britpop is viewed as a marketing tool, and more of a cultural moment than a musical style or genre, there are musical conventions and influences the bands grouped under the Britpop term have in common, such as showing elements from the British pop music of the Sixties, glam rock and punk rock of the Seventies, and indie pop of the Eighties in their music. Britpop was a media driven focus on bands which emerged from the independent music scene of the early 1990s—and was associated with the British popular cultural movement of Cool Britannia which evoked the Swinging Sixties and the British guitar pop music of that decade. In the wake of the musical invasion into the United Kingdom by American grunge bands, new British groups such as Blur and Suede launched the movement by positioning themselves as opposing musical forces, referencing British guitar music of the past and writing about uniquely British topics and concerns. These bands were soon joined by others including Oasis, Pulp, the Verve, Supergrass, Cast, Sleeper and Elastica. Britpop groups brought British alternative rock into the mainstream and formed the backbone of a larger British cultural movement called Cool Britannia. “The Battle of Britpop” brought Britpop to the forefront of the British press in 1995. By 1997, however, the movement began to slow down; many acts began to falter and break up. The popularity of the pop group the Spice Girls “snatched the spirit of the age from those responsible for Britpop”. Although its more popular bands were able to spread their commercial success overseas, especially to the United States, the movement largely fell apart by the end of the decade.

Superfoods: The Real Story - Decline - Netflix

Oasis' third album Be Here Now (1997) was highly anticipated. Despite initially attracting positive reviews and selling strongly, the record was soon subjected to strong criticism from music critics, record-buyers and even Noel Gallagher himself for its overproduced and bloated sound. Music critic Jon Savage pinpointed Be Here Now as the moment where Britpop ended; Savage said that while the album “isn't the great disaster that everybody says,” he noted that “[i]t was supposed to be the big, big triumphal record” of the period. At the same time, Blur sought to distance Blur from Britpop with their self-titled fifth album (1997), assimilating American lo-fi influences such as Pavement. Albarn explained to the NME in January 1997 that “We created a movement: as far as the lineage of British bands goes, there'll always be a place for us ... We genuinely started to see that world in a slightly different way.” As Briptop slowed, many acts began to falter and broke up. The popularity of the pop group the Spice Girls has been seen as having “snatched the spirit of the age from those responsible for Britpop.” While established acts struggled, attention began to turn to the likes of Radiohead and the Verve, who had been previously overlooked by the British media. These two bands—in particular Radiohead—showed considerably more esoteric influences from the 1960s and 1970s that were uncommon among earlier Britpop acts. In 1997, Radiohead and the Verve released their respective albums OK Computer and Urban Hymns, both widely acclaimed. Post-Britpop bands such as Travis, Stereophonics and Coldplay, influenced by Britpop acts, particularly Oasis, with more introspective lyrics, were some of the most successful rock acts of the late 1990s and early 2000s.

Superfoods: The Real Story - References - Netflix


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