Loveless - Netflix

Sun 23 June 2019

Filed under netflix

Tags netflix Animation Japanese

Twelve-year old Aoyagi Ritsuka lost his only kin when his brother, Aoyagi Seimei, was killed under mysterious circumstances. One day, he meets Wagatsuma Soubi, who claims to know his brother. It turns out that Soubi and Seimei used to be a fighting pair, whereby Soubi was the "Fighting Machine" and Seimei was the "Sacrifice". Now that Seimei is gone, Soubi 'belongs' to Ritsuka who will become his new "Sacrifice". After learning that Seimei was killed by an organisation known as the "Seventh Moon", Ritsuka decides to join forces with Soubi and investigate the truth behind his brother's death.

Loveless - Netflix

Type: Animation

Languages: Japanese

Status: Ended

Runtime: 25 minutes

Premier: 2005-04-06

Loveless - Wild Wild West - Netflix

Wild Wild West is a 1999 American western action comedy film directed by Barry Sonnenfeld. It was written by S. S. Wilson and Brent Maddock (whose previous collaborations include the Short Circuit and Tremors franchises), along with Jeffrey Price and Peter S. Seaman. A big-screen adaptation of the 1960s TV series The Wild Wild West, it stars Will Smith, Kevin Kline, Kenneth Branagh and Salma Hayek. The film takes the steampunk gadgetry from the original series to still more fantastical lengths with a series of unlikely contraptions culminating in a giant mechanical spider. Wild Wild West was a commercial disappointment, earning only $222.1 million worldwide against a $170 million budget, and received predominantly negative reviews.

Loveless - Changes from the television series - Netflix

Significant changes were made to Dr. Loveless as portrayed by Kenneth Branagh in the film. He went from a dwarf to a man without legs; his first name was also changed from Miguelito to Arliss and he was given the motive of a Southerner who sought the defeat of the North after the Civil War. Kevin Kline plays Gordon, whose character was similar to the version played by Ross Martin except that he was much more competitive with James West, besides being much more egotistical. The film script had Kline's Gordon invent more ridiculous, humor-related, and implausible contraptions than those created by Martin's Gordon in the television series. The film also depicted West and Gordon as aggressive rivals, whereas in the television series, West and Gordon had a very close friendship and trusted each other with their lives. Also, while Gordon did indeed impersonate Grant in the series (“The Night of the Steel Assassin”, “The Night of the Colonel's Ghost” and “The Night of the Big Blackmail”) they were not played by the same actor. Additionally, on the TV show, West was portrayed by Robert Conrad, a Caucasian, rather than an African American — which serves a critical plot point, as West's parents were among the victims of Loveless's massacre at New Liberty). Jon Peters served as producer along with director Sonnenfeld. In a 2002 Q&A event that appears in An Evening with Kevin Smith, writer-director Kevin Smith talked about working with Peters on a fifth potential Superman film in 1997, revealing that Peters had three demands for the script. The first demand was that Superman not wear the suit, the second was that Superman not fly, and the third was to have Superman fight a giant spider in the third act. After Tim Burton came on board, Smith's script was tossed away and the film was never produced due to further complications. A year later, he noted that Wild Wild West, with Peters on board as producer, was released with the inclusion of a giant mechanical spider in the final act. Neil Gaiman has said that Jon Peters also insisted a giant mechanical spider be included in a film adaptation of The Sandman.

Loveless - References - Netflix


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